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One Shields Avenue
Davis CA
95616-8627

Ph.D. Candidates and Students

JenniferHaskell

Jennifer Haskell

Jennifer Haskell | is a Ph.D. student in Soil and Biogeochemistry in the Aridlab at the University of California, Davis. Jennifer’s primary research interests include carbon flux in arid systems, as well as understanding climate change’s impact on agriculture--particularly the response of microbial populations. She is also interested in shifts in biomes, and developing new methods of agroecology. Jennifer’s current goal is to better understand the distribution of soil inorganic carbon storage and its changes due to agricultural land use activity.


LOUISA ROGERS

Louisa Rogers | has a BA in biology from Whitman College and is a Ph.D. student in the Soils and Biogeochemistry program at UC Davis. She is interested in the globally important plant symbionts, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and their ecological roles in natural systems. She would like to focus her research on the effects of AMF on carbon and nutrient cycling in arid systems, and how these complex effects are dynamic over environmental gradients and time.


Karen Tanner

Karen Tanner | is a graduate student at UC Santa Cruz in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, co-advised by Dr. Ingrid Parker (UCSC) and Dr. Rebecca R. Hernandez (UCD).  She is continuing to work on a long-term research project that she started in 2011 with the support of a Jill Barrett Foundation grant from Mills College. This project employs an experimental shading study to investigate the impact of changes in shading, water runoff, and soil temperature regimes on rare and common annual desert plants. Demographic response of study taxa and alterations in community composition under experimental panels may be linked to potential impacts of large-scale solar development in the Mojave Desert. Karen has a keen interest in conservation of California’s native flora, particularly within the context of human disturbance and biological invasions. An understanding of how and why invasions occur can be essential to effective conservation, and Karen plans to continue to contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms that control invasion success and promote development of effective mitigation strategies as a graduate student.

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